COVID-19 pandemic: Britain’s iconic Beefeaters facing job cuts

London [UK], July 21 (ANI): Amid the global coronavirus pandemic, Britain’s iconic Beefeaters, who guard the millennium-old Tower of London, are facing job cuts.

July 21, 2020

World

2 min

zeenews

London [UK], July 21 (ANI): Amid the global coronavirus pandemic, Britain’s iconic Beefeaters, who guard the millennium-old Tower of London, are facing job cuts.
Countries have put up severe restrictions on places to curb the spread of coronavirus.
Visitors to the landmark have fallen off sharply amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, according to the Historic Royal Palaces, the independent charity that manages the site, reported Washington Post.
Founded by Henry VII in 1485, the Yeomen Warders as they are formally known, clad in flamboyant ruby and gold or navy blue uniforms, were the traditional guards of prisoners and the Crown Jewels, a collection of more than 23,000 gleaming gemstones and key items connected to the British monarchy — including emerald-encrusted crowns, coronation robes and medals.
Washington Post quoted a beefeater who spoke on condition of anonymity as saying that the corps had spent years serving the public and protecting the tower only to be asked to take voluntary redundancies during an uncertain time.
John Barnes, the chief executive of Historic Royal Palaces, was quoted as saying that the charity was “heartbroken,” but had “no choice but to reduce payroll costs” amid the financial blow dealt by the global health crisis.
“Historic Royal Palaces is a self-funded charity. We depend on visitors for 80 per cent of our income,” Barnes said. He added that the closure of the tower and other sites such as Kensington Palace had “dealt a devastating blow” to funds needed to keep the attractions running.
The UK is one of the worst affected countries in the world due to coronavirus pandemic with over 296,944 cases and over 45,000 deaths.
Barnes said the 16-week closure had resulted in a shortfall of some $123 million.
Historic Royal Palaces confirmed to The Washington Post that a voluntary redundancy plan was in place and that staff had been told compulsory redundancies were likely to follow.
The tower, which is Britain’s most visited paid attraction, reopened to public on July 10. (ANI)

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